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Friday, February 17, 2023

Returning to The Diary of Anne Frank

From a Psychoanalytic Developmental Perspective

Presented by Katherine Dalsimer, Ph.D.

 

6:00 PM to 6:30 PM socializing

6:30 PM to 7:30 PM presentation

7:30 PM to 8:30 PM Q&A

Gratis unless you would like continuing education credits, (pending) in which case the fee is $12.  Check to Dr. Sheorn

ZOOM

https://zoom.us/join

Enter Meeting Number:  527-999-5540 (no password needed)

 

REGISTRATION AND FEES – RSVP TO

Keyhill Sheorn, MD  [email protected]

3801 Commodore Point Place, Suite 200

Midlothian, VA 23112  804.240.1095

About our speaker

Katherine Dalsimer, Ph.D., is a member of the faculty of the Columbia University Center for Psychoanalytic Training and Research, and is Clinical Professor of Psychology in the Department of Psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical College. Previously she was Senior Psychologist at the Columbia University Mental Health Service.

Dr. Dalsimer has taught undergraduates at Columbia and residents in psychiatry at Cornell. Throughout her teaching and writing, she has drawn upon works of literature to explore psychological questions. In addition to numerous presentations, articles, and book chapters, she is the author of Female Adolescence: Psychoanalytic Reflections on Literature and Virginia Woolf: Becoming a Writer, both published by Yale University Press. Her most recent publication is a chapter titled “Encountering Invisible Presence: Virginia Woolf and Julia Duckworth Stephen” in The Cambridge Companion to Literature and Psychoanalysis, ed. V. Camden. Cambridge University Press, 2022.

SUMMARY:

Anne Frank is known around the world by the millions who have read her diary. First published in Dutch in 1947 and since translated into 70 languages, its pages were left scattered on the floor by the SS when the Franks’ hiding place in Amsterdam was discovered and its eight occupants sent to concentration camps. Only her father, Otto Frank, survived. Anne died in Bergen Belsen a few months before her 16th birthday.

Anne Frank cannot change. She will always be the 13-year-old, then 14-year old, then 15-year-old girl we have come to know through her diary. Anne cannot change–but we, her readers, have changed. For us, time has gone on. We are older than we were when we first encountered Anne Frank–perhaps in high school, reading her diary when we ourselves were close to the age she was when she wrote it.

And the world has changed. Over eighty years have passed since the day Anne Frank began to keep her diary: it was June 12, 1942, her 13th birthday. We are living in a world different from the one in which she wrote her diary, and different from the post-war period in which it was first published. Changed as we ourselves are–altered as our world is–I propose to return to this work of a young writer, whose name I believe we would know as a writer had she lived to fulfill the remarkable promise of what she has given us.

Objectives:

Objective 1:  To learn about the elements of healthy female development in adolescence

Objective 2:  To focus on the adolescence of the future writer

Objective 3:  To reflect on the personal context that we, as readers, bring to The Diary of Anne Frank

References:

Katherine Dalsimer (l986), Female Adolescence: Psychoanalytic Reflections on Literature. New Haven and London: Yale University Press.

Anne Frank (1991), The Diary of a Young Girl: Definitive Edition.  New York: Anchor Books.

Continuing Education (pending approval) – $12

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of American Psychoanalytic Association and the Virginia Psychoanalytic Society. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The American Psychoanalytic Association designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 2.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. 

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters of this CME program have any relevant financial relationships to disclose.  For further information, contact Eli Zaller, M.D. at [email protected]  or 804-288- 3251. 

Up to 2.0 CEU’s (pending approval) are available for Licensed Clinical Psychologists and Licensed Professional Counselors in accordance with the applicable requirements of the Virginia Board of Psychology.  There is no extra fee beyond the cost of the meeting.  Eligibility for credit is contingent upon the Virginia Psychoanalytic Society’s receipt of the forms verifying attendance, as signed and validated by the monitor at the meeting.  For further information, contact Margaret DuVall, Ph.D. at [email protected] or 804-840-3592. 

Up to 2.0 CEU’s are available for MSW’s pending approval by NASW VIRGINIA. The application costs are included in your registration fee.  MSW CEU requests will be sent to NASW VIRGINIA by the Virginia Psychoanalytic Society. For further information, contact Susan Stones, LCSW [email protected] or 757-622-9852×207.

Friday, March 17, 2023

Virtue in Violence: The Moral Foundations of Military Character

Presented by Rafael Triana, Ph.D.

6:00 PM to 6:30 PM socializing

6:30 PM to 7:30 PM presentation

7:30 PM to 8:30 PM Q&A

Gratis unless you would like continuing education credits, (pending) in which case the fee is $12. Please send your check to Dr. Sheorn

ZOOM

https://zoom.us/join

Enter Meeting Number:  527-999-5540 (no password needed)

 

REGISTRATION AND FEES – RSVP TO

Keyhill Sheorn, MD  [email protected]

3801 Commodore Point Place, Suite 200

Midlothian, VA 23112  804.240.1095

About our speaker

Rafael Triana, Ph.D.

Dr. Triana is a Psychoanalyst and a Licensed Clinical Social Worker. Currently, in private practice, he provides treatment for a broad range of psychiatric disorders. His theoretical area of interest is in the application of contemporary neuro-psychoanalytic theory and neuroscience research in the treatment of late adolescents and young adults as well as in veterans who have experienced combat trauma.

In 2021, after 35 years of service, he retired from the faculty of the University of Virginia where he served as an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Neuro-behavioral Sciences and Senior Staff Clinician in Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS), in the Department of Student Health and Wellness. In 1995 he merged three mental health services and developed standards of practice as well as an APA approved training program for the Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) and became the first Director of the service. At CAPS, along with clinical practice, he provided a range of seminars and supervision to psychology and social work interns and post-doctoral candidates.

In the Department of Psychiatry and Neurobehavioral Sciences, he provided supervision and a range of clinical seminars and special topics for psychiatric residents as well as providing CEU workshops.

As a consultant, he works with mental health professionals, families and parents on issues of mental health, psychodynamics and human development. In addition, he provides clinical supervision and consultations as well as presentations on issues pertaining to military service, combat, and veteran status.

In the Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities, he was the faculty Director for Medical Spanish and Culture.

In addition, he has supervised first-year and second year candidates in the China-America Psychoanalytic Alliance (CAPA) training program via tele-video.

He received a master’s and Ph.D. degree in Clinical Social Work from Smith College School of Social Work. Dr. Triana also holds B.A. in Drama and M. A. in Religious Studies with a concentration in Buddhism from the University of Virginia. His education includes a four-year fellowship in the Mental Health Division at Yale University Health Services, and completion of psychoanalytic training at the Washington Center for Psychoanalysis where he had served as affiliated faculty in the New Directions writers’ program.

He also graduated from the American Academy of Dramatic Arts and worked as a professional actor in New York City.

As a Sergeant in the Marine Corp, he served as Long Range Reconnaissance Patrol Leader for two tours of duty in the Viet Nam War. He was awarded the Bronze Star for meritorious service in combat. He is a first-generation Cuban American raised in New York inner city Hispanic “barrio.”

SUMMARY

Although modern warfare has been radically transformed, the ultimate ancient question a soldier faces, and one by which society judges the military ethos, is can violence be virtuous? A critical question that takes the form of a moral oxymoron leading to cognitive dissonance that can engender ambivalence, confusion, misunderstanding and bias, overt and implicit. Due to numerous unpopular wars (for some unjust wars) and military interventions during the post WWII era, national attitudes toward the military have fluctuated, from the heroic to ignoble most egregiously during the Viet Nam War era. Currently, the US military faces the largest drop in recruitment in 50 years. In the U.S., 0.004% of Americans are currently serving in the military and less than .07% are veterans, a decline from 18% in 1980, a decline that is predicted to continue.

This presentation is not to condemn or romanticize war. It is an explanatory commentary on the moral principles embodied in military life. The presentation will include a discussion of the Constrained and Unconstrained “Moral Visions” that result in incompatible conclusions about war and the origins of violence. To facilitate this discussion the works of Thomas Sowell, Jonathan Haidt and Steven Pinker will be considered. To elucidate a framework for understanding the underlying principles in the formation of military character, Virtue Ethics (Aristotle and Rousseau) and Phronesis (“Practical Wisdom”) will be outlined.

Objectives:

Objective 1:  Describe several key contributions of Hans Loewald, and how together they have reshaped our understanding of the therapeutic action of psychoanalysis.

Objective 2:  Identify the lineage, key contributors and major tenets of the American Independent Tradition of Intersubjective Ego Psychology.

Objective 3:  Understand the major assertions of Philip Bromberg regarding normal psychological functioning, normal and pathological dissociation, and their implications for psychoanalytic listening and interaction.

Objective 4:  Recognize where Bromberg’s contributions extend beyond those represented by the Independent American Tradition of Intersubjective Ego Psychology and be able to speak to why they agree or disagree.

References:

Bromberg, P. M. (1995) Resistance, Object-usage, And Human Relatedness. Contemporary Psychoanalysis 31:173

Bromberg, P. M. (1996) Standing in the Spaces: The Multiplicity Of Self And The Psychoanalytic Relationship. Contemporary Psychoanalysis 32:509-535

Chodorow, N. J. (2003) The psychoanalytic vision of Hans Loewald. International Journal of Psychoanalysis 84:897-913

Bromberg, P. M. (2009) Truth, Human Relatedness, and the Analytic Process: An Interpersonal/Relational Perspective. International Journal of Psychoanalysis 90:347-361

Bucci, W. (2001) Pathways of Emotional Communication. Psychoanalytic Inquiry 21:40-70

Chodorow, N. J. (2004) The American Independent Tradition: Loewald, Erikson, and the (Possible) Rise of Intersubjective Ego Psychology. Psychoanalytic Dialogues 14:207-232

Cooper, A. M. (1988) Our Changing Views of the Therapeutic Action of Psychoanalysis: Comparing Strachey and Loewald. Psychoanalytic Quarterly 57:15-27

Galatzer-Levy, R. M. (2009) Good Vibrations: Analytic Process as Coupled Oscillations. International Journal of Psychoanalysis 90:983-1007

Loewald, H. W. (1951) Ego and Reality. International Journal of Psychoanalysis 32:10-18

Loewald, H. W. (1952) The Problem of Defence and the Neurotic Interpretation of Reality. International Journal of Psychoanalysis 33:444-449

Loewald, H. W. (1955) Hypnoid State, Repression, Abreaction and Recollection. Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association 3:201-210

Loewald, H. W. (1960) On the Therapeutic Action of Psycho-Analysis. International Journal of Psychoanalysis 41:16-33

Loewald, H. W. (1972) The Experience of Time. Psychoanalytic Study of the Child 27:401-410

Schore, A. N. (2007) Review of Awakening the Dreamer: Clinical Journeys by Philip M. Bromberg. Psychoanalytic Dialogues 17:753-767

Continuing Education (pending approval) – $12

This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of American Psychoanalytic Association and the Virginia Psychoanalytic Society. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

The American Psychoanalytic Association designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 2.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

 IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters of this CME program have any relevant financial relationships to disclose.  For further information, please contact Eli Zaller, M.D. at  [email protected] or 804-288- 3251. 

Up to 2.0 CEU’s are available for Licensed Clinical Psychologists and Licensed Professional Counselors in accordance with the applicable requirements of the Virginia Board of Psychology.  There is no extra fee beyond the cost of the meeting.  Eligibility for credit is contingent upon the Virginia Psychoanalytic Society’s receipt of the forms verifying attendance, as signed and validated by the monitor at the meeting.  For further information, contact Margaret DuVall, Ph.D. at [email protected] or 804-840-3592. 

Up to 2.0 CEU’s are available for MSW’s by NASW VIRGINIA. The application costs are included in your registration fee.  MSW CEU requests will be sent to NASW VIRGINIA by the Virginia Psychoanalytic Society. For further information, contact Susan Stones, LCSW [email protected] or 757-622-9852×207.