Submit this form following the Meeting

VPsaS Summary Evaluation Form

Submit this form 6 – 9 weeks after the Meeting

VPsaS Evaluation Form

May will feature Alan Bass.

All meetings are planned as virtual events.

Friday, March 19, 2021

“Are We All Child Psychoanalysts?”
Justine Kalas Reeves, PsyD, LICSW
6:00 PM to 6:30 PM socializing
6:30 PM to 7:30 PM discussion via Zoom
7:30 PM to 8:30 PM Q & A via Zoom
Gratis unless you would like continuing education credits, in which case the fee is $12.
Zoom: https://zoom.us/join
Enter Meeting Number: 527-999-5540 (no password required)

REGISTRATION AND FEES – RSVP TO
Keyhill Sheorn, MD
1001 Boulders Parkway, Suite 160
Richmond, VA 23225 804.323.0003
sheorn@mac.com

SUMMARY: Since we take it as given that psychoanalysis is a developmental,
epigenetic domain even though development is non-linear, are we all child
psychoanalysts, analyzing the id, ego and superego of the inner child and/or
adolescent of our adult patients? Using clinical examples of adult patients who
suffered at nodal points in their development, the idea of the therapist as
developmental object is explored, as is transference of defense (also known as an
“externalizing transference”).

Objectives:
1) Participants will be able to describe why psychoanalysis is a developmental domain
2) Participants will discern the difference between promoting progressive adult development and “developmental disharmonies”
3) Participants will explain how a therapist can be a “developmental object”
4) Participants will distinguish between transference of unconscious wishes and transference of defense.

References:
1) Edgcumbe, R. (1983). Anna Freud—child analyst. International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 64, 427–433.
2) Furman, E. (1982). Mothers have to be there to be left. Psychoanalytic Study of the Child, 37, 15–28. doi:10.1080/00797308.1982.11823356
3) Furman, R. A. (1980). Some vicissitudes of the transition into latency. In S. I.Greenspan & G. H. Pollock (Eds.), The course of life (pp. 33–43). Washington, DC: NIMH, U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services.
4) Hurry, A. (1998). Psychoanalysis and developmental therapy. London, England: Karnac.
5) Iovino, N. (2014). Drosophila epigenome reorganization during oocyte differentiation and early embryogenesis. Briefings in Functional Genomics,
13(3), 246–253. doi:10.1093/bfgp/elu007
6) Luepnitz, D. A. (2009). Thinking in the space between Winnicott and Lacan. The International Journal of Psychoanalysis, 90(5), 957–981. doi:10.1111/j.1745- 8315.2009.00156.x
7) Malabou, C. (2016). Before tomorrow: Epigenesis and rationality. Cambridge, England: Polity Press.
8) Novick, J., & Novick, K. K. (1996). Ch. 4: Postoedipal transformations: Latency, adolescence, and pathogenesis. In Fearful symmetry: The development and treatment of sadomasochism. Northvale, NJ: Aronson.
9) Perry, B. D., Pollard, R., Blakely, T., Baker, W., Vigilante, D. (1995). Childhood trauma, the neurobiology of adaptation and “use-dependent” development of the brain: How “states” become “traits.” Infant Mental Health Journal, 16(4), 271–291. doi:10.1002/1097-0355(199524)16:4<271::AID-IMHJ2280160404>3.0.CO;2-B
10) Tähkä, R. (2004). Illusion and reality in the psychoanalytic relationship. In A. Laine (Ed.), Power of understanding: Essays in honour of Veikko Tähkä (pp. 73–99). London, England: Karnac.
11) Tähkä, V. (1993). Mind and its treatment: A psychoanalytic approach. Madison, CT: International Universities Press.
12) Välimäki, J. (2004). On the idea of a new developmental object in psychoanalytic treatment. In A. Laine (Ed.), Power of understanding: Essays in honour of Veikko Tähkä (pp. 277–300). London, England: Karnac.
13) Waelder, R. (1967). Inhibitions, Symptoms and Anxiety: Forty Years Later. Psychoanalytic Quarterly, 36:1-36.

Bio
Dr. Reeves is a former Secretary of the Association for Child Psychoanalysis. She
helped design and implement the integrated curriculum at CFS-DC such that
candidates can train to be ‘life cycle analysts’-that is, able to treat all ages, cradle to
grave. She trained in child/adolescent psychoanalysis at the Anna Freud Centre, and
adult psychoanalysis at CFS-DC. She lives in Washington, DC with her husband, a
historian, and 15-year-old daughter. She also has a 22-year-old son who lives in
Philadelphia.

Continuing Education – $12
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the
accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for
Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of
American Psychoanalytic Association and the Virginia Psychoanalytic Society.
The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACCME to
provide continuing medical education for physicians.
The American Psychoanalytic Association designates this Live Activity for a
maximum of 2.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only
the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.
IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL
LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters of this CME program have any
relevant financial relationships to disclose. For further information, contact Eli
Zaller, M.D. at richmondpsych1@verizon.net or 804-288- 3251.
Up to 2.0 CEU’s are available for Licensed Clinical Psychologists and Licensed
Professional Counselors in accordance with the applicable requirements of the
Virginia Board of Psychology. There is no extra fee beyond the cost of the meeting.

Eligibility for credit is contingent upon the Virginia Psychoanalytic Society’s receipt
of the forms verifying attendance, as signed and validated by the monitor at the
meeting. For further information, contact Margaret Duvall, Ph.D. at
mlduvall@rcn.com or 804-340-5290.
Up to 2.0 CEU’s are available for MSW’s by NASW VIRGINIA. The application
costs are included in your registration fee. MSW CEU requests will be sent to
NASW VIRGINIA by the Virginia Psychoanalytic Society. For further information,
contact Susan Stones, LCSW shstones413@gmail.com or 757-622-9852×15.

PLEASE NOTE:

For attendance purposes, on the day of the presentation please email Dr. Zaller
(richmondpsych1@verizon.net) with your name and home/office emails. Within 10
days of the presentation, please submit the Evaluation Form to Dr. Zaller. The form
can be found on https://vpsas.org/

Friday, April 16, 2021

“When physician becomes a patient: A primer for the treater.”
Michael L. McClam, MD CAPT, USN (RET)
Associate Chief of Inpatient Services for the Menninger Clinic and an Assistant Professor at
Baylor College of Medicine, The Menninger Department of Psychiatry.
6:00 PM to 6:30 PM socializing
6:30 PM to 7:30 PM discussion via Zoom
7:30 PM to 8:30 PM Q & A via Zoom
Gratis unless you would like continuing education credits, in which case the fee is $12.
Zoom https://zoom.us/join Enter Meeting Number: 527-999-5540 (no password required)

REGISTRATION AND FEES – RSVP TO
Keyhill Sheorn, MD
1001 Boulders Parkway, Suite 160
Richmond, VA 23225 804.323.0003
sheorn@mac.com

SUMMARY: When physician becomes a patient: A primer for the treater.
Ever have a physician patient? Physicians are people and are susceptible to physical and
emotional illness just like the general population. However, physicians can be notoriously
difficult patients. The culture of medicine encourages physicians to be rugged individuals and
work through illness. Often physicians delay their own care in the service of avoiding facing
personal vulnerability and in part a fantasy to a heroic sacrifice in the service of their patients.
When physicians do seek treatment, they may view it as a failure. Emotional or mental health
crises may present a particular challenge for the physician. In most instances, defenses like
delayed gratification, intellectualization, isolation of affect are adaptive to the practice of
medicine. However, when in treatment, those defenses can get in the way of treatment. The
treating therapist, consequently, will have their own struggles with treating a physician. The
treating physician may have positive countertransference given their shared educational and
practice experiences and subsequent reluctance to challenge a physician patient on defenses or
resistance in therapy or may not feel as qualified to treat a physician patient. A physician patient
may be a referral from a physician wellness board.

Objectives:
1) Describe the personality characteristics that are generally found in physicians
2) Discuss the prevalence of psychiatric and substance use disorders that occur in the
physician population
3) Explain the kinds of ethical dilemmas that occur when treating a physician
4) Discuss typical defense mechanisms, transference, and countertransference that occurs
when conducting psychotherapy with a physician

Bio:
Michael McClam, MD is currently the Associate Chief of Inpatient Services for the Menninger
Clinic and an Assistant Professor at Baylor College of Medicine, The Menninger Department of
Psychiatry. Prior to that, he worked on the Professionals in Crisis Unit, first as a staff
psychiatrist, then as the program manager. He also had previous assignment to the Michael E
DeBakey VAMC where he was the psychiatric consultant to the emergency department. Prior to
that, Dr. McClam was active duty Navy, assigned to Naval Medical Center, Portsmouth VA,
where he served in various clinical and administrative capacities.  He was deployed to Camp
Arifjan, Kuwait, and Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. His
clinical interests are psychotherapy and treatment of professionals both civilian and military.

References:
1. Widerhold BK, Cipresso P, Pizzioli, D, Wierderhold, M, Riva G: Intervention for physician
burnout: A systematic review. Open Med. 2018; 13: 253-263
2. Zhang X, Song Y, Jiang T, Ding N, Shi T: Interventions to reduce burnout of physicians and
nurses: An overview of systematic reviews and meta-analysis. Medicine (2020) 99:26
3. Pearson M, Strecker, E: Physicians as Psychiatric Patients: Private Practice Experience.
The American Journal of Psychiatry 1960 April; 915-919.
4. Mehta S, Edwards, M: Suffering in Silence: Mental Health Stigma and Physician’s
Licensing Fears. The American Journal of Psychiatry Resident’s Journal Nov 2018; 2-4
5. Shortt, S: Psychiatric Illness in Physicians. CMA Journal 121: Aug 4, 1979 283-288
6. Cho H, Huang, C: Why Mental Health-Related Stigma Matters for Physician Wellbeing,
Burnout, and Patient Care. J Gen Intern Med 35(5): 1579-81
7. Gabbard G: The Role of Compulsiveness in the Normal Physician JAMA, Nov 22/29, 1985
(245) 20; 2926-2929
8. Hampton, T. Experts Address Risk of Physician Suicide. JAMA. 2005;294(10):1189-1191.
9. Myers, M.; Gabbard, G. The Physician as Patient: A Clinical Handbook for Mental Health
Professionals. American Psychiatric Publishing, 2008. Print.
10. Wallace JE, Lamaire JB, Ghali WA. Physician Wellness: a missing quality indicator. Lancet
2009; 374: 1714-21
11. American Psychiatric Association: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders,
Fifth Edition. Arlington, VA, American Psychiatric Association, 2013, pages 678-682
12. Dutheil F, Auber C, Pereira B, Dambrun M, Moustafa F, Mermillod M, Baker J, Trousselard
M, Lesage F, Navel, V: Suicide among physicians and health-care workers: A systematic
review and meta-analysis PLOS ONE | https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0226361
December 12, 2019 (accessed 11 Feb 21)
13. Romo V. NYC Emergency Room Physician Who Treated Coronavirus Patients Dies by
Suicide NPR, 28. April 2020. https://www.npr.org/sections/coronavirus-live-
updates/2020/04/28/847305408/nyc-emergency-room-physician-who-treated-coronavirus-
patients-dies-by-suicide?t=1588799220486
Continuing Education – $12
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation
requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education
(ACCME) through the joint providership of American Psychoanalytic Association and the
Virginia Psychoanalytic Society. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited
by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
The American Psychoanalytic Association designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 2.0
AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with
the extent of their participation in the activity.
IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS:
None of the planners and presenters of this CME program have any relevant financial
relationships to disclose. For further information, contact Eli Zaller, M.D. at
richmondpsych1@verizon.net or 804-288- 3251.
Up to 2.0 CEU’s are available for Licensed Clinical Psychologists and Licensed Professional
Counselors in accordance with the applicable requirements of the Virginia Board of Psychology.
There is no extra fee beyond the cost of the meeting. Eligibility for credit is contingent upon the
Virginia Psychoanalytic Society’s receipt of the forms verifying attendance, as signed and
validated by the monitor at the meeting. For further information, contact Margaret Duvall, Ph.D.
at mlduvall@rcn.com or 804-340-5290.
Up to 2.0 CEU’s are available for MSW’s by NASW VIRGINIA. The application costs are
included in your registration fee. MSW CEU requests will be sent to NASW VIRGINIA by the
Virginia Psychoanalytic Society. For further information, contact Susan Stones, LCSW
shstones413@gmail.com or 757-622-9852×15.

PLEASE NOTE:
For attendance purposes, on the day of the presentation please email Dr. Zaller
(richmondpsych1@verizon.net) with your name and home/office emails. Within 10 days of the
presentation, please submit the Evaluation Form to Dr. Zaller. The form can be found on
https://vpsas.org/